Epithets of Hera, Two Hymns and a Prayer

Greek Epithets of Hera

Agreie (of Argos)
Aigophagos (Goat-Eater)
Akraia (of the Heights)
Alexandros (Defender of Men)
Ammonia (of the Oracle of Zeus Ammon in Libya)
Antheia (of the Flowers)
Aphroditê (of Aphrodite)
Argôia (of the Ship Argo)
Autorôtê (Unbulled; Virgin)
Boophis (Cow-Eyed)
Bounaia (of Bounos; a hero)
Gamelia (of Marriage)
Hêniokhê (of the Chariot)
Hippia (of the Horses)
Hyperkheiria (Whose Hand is Above)
Khera (the Widow)
Lakinia (of Lakinios; a hero)
Leukolenos (White-Armed)
Limenia (of the Harbor)
Nympheuomene (Led as a Bride)
Pais (Maiden)
Parthenos (Virgin)
Pelasga (Pelasgian Woman or Goddess)
Prodromia (of the Pioneer)
Teleia (Accomplisher)
Zugia (Yoking Goddess)
Zygia (Uniter)

English Epithets of Hera

Almighty Queen
Blessed Goddess
Blessed Queen
Bride of the Thunderer
Divine
Glorious Goddess
Goddess of Childbirth
Golden One
Golden Throned
Majestic
Mistress of Animals
Mother of Showers and Wind
Queen of Heaven
Queen of the Gods
Queen of All Goddesses
Queen of Olympos
Royal
Savior


Cult Place Titles

Argeia (Of Argos)
Olympia (Of Olympia in Ellis)
Pharygaia (Of Pharygaia in Lokris)
Samia (Of Samos)

Cult Terms

Hêraion (Temple of Hera)
Hêraia (Festival of Hera)
Daidala (a Festival of Hera)

Homeric Hymn to Hera
XII. TO HERA

[1] I sing of golden-throned Hera whom Rhea bare. Queen of the immortals is she, surpassing all in beauty: she is the sister and the wife of loud-thundering Zeus, — the glorious one whom all the blessed throughout high Olympus reverence and honour even as Zeus who delights in thunder.

Orphic Hymn to Hera
[15] XV. TO JUNO [HERA]

The Fumigation from Aromatics.
O Royal Juno [Hera] of majestic mien, aerial-form’d, divine, Jove’s [Zeus’] blessed queen,
Thron’d in the bosom of cærulean air, the race of mortals is thy constant care.
The cooling gales thy pow’r alone inspires, which nourish life, which ev’ry life desires.
Mother of clouds and winds, from thee alone producing all things, mortal life is known:
All natures share thy temp’rament divine, and universal sway alone is thine.
With founding blasts of wind, the swelling sea and rolling rivers roar, when shook by thee.
Come, blessed Goddess, fam’d almighty queen, with aspect kind, rejoicing and serene.

From Apuleius, The Golden Ass 6. 3 ff (trans. Walsh) (Roman novel C2nd A.D.)

Prayer to Hera
‘Sister and spouse of mighty Jupiter [Zeus],
whether you reside in your ancient shrine at Samos,
which alone can pride itself on your birth,
your infant cries,
and your nurture;
or whether you occupy your blessed abode in lofty Carthage,
which worships you as the maiden who tours the sky on a lion’s back [a goddess at Carthage identified with Hera];
or whether you guard the famed walls of the Argives,
by the banks of the river-god Inachus,
who now hymns you as bride of the Thunderer and as queen of all goddesses;
you, whom all the East reveres as the yoking goddess,
and whom all the West addresses as Lucina [goddess of childbirth], be for me in my most acute misfortunes Juno [Hera] the Saviour, and free me from looming dangers in my weariness from exhausting toils.
I am told that it is your practice to lend unsolicited aid to pregnant women in danger.”

Note

*This was in my initial list of epithets for Hera. I can’t seem to find the source.

Sources

Theoi.com: Cult of Hera

Neos Alexandria: Hera

Homeric Hymns. translated by G. Evelyn-White. Found here: http://www.theoi.com/Text/HomericHymns3.html#12

Orphic Hymn to Hera found here:
http://www.theoi.com/Text/OrphicHymns1.html#15

The Orphic Hymns: Text, Translation and Notes, trans. By Apostolos N. Athanassakis. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1977, 1988.

The Homeric Hymns: A Translation, with Introduction and Notes. translated by Diane Rayor. University of California Press, 2004.

Burkett, Walter. Greek Religion. John Raffan, trans. Harvard University Press, 1985.

Connelly, Joan Breton. Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece. Princeton University Press, 2007.

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