Links

Links Update

My Links page has been updated.

The Temple of Nut
A page dedicated to Nut, Star Goddess of Heaven and Night.

Emerald and Black
A blog of a polytheist.

Kina’ani: Impressions of Tess Dawson, Canaanite Polytheist
Blog of author Tess Dawson.

The Shrine of the Goddess Athena
This website is a great resource to the Greek Goddess Athena, Goddess of wisdom, war, crafts and knowledge.

Aset, Auset, Isis, Links, Oracles, Poems, Poetry,

Link and Our Hands, Eyes and Ears

Kiya Nicoll has posted a blog post about honoring humanity and the dead. Bone Stories

Here is my poem inspired by Kiya’s post.

Our Hands, Eyes and Ears

To do is to be in this world.
This is a sacred thing.
You need to do in order to know.
Thinking does not help the hungry.
Thinking does not give boats to the boatless.
Thinking does not feed the people.
Doing does this.
Be in this world that We created.
Act in this world.
Be Our Hands.
Be Our Eyes.
Be Our Ears.
Be Our Mouths.
Hold those who need shelter.
Watch those who need protection.
Listen to those who are in pain.
Speak to those who need to hear.
Renewing Our Cults, Our Worship is one form of devotion.
But if all you do, is be in Our shrines,
how will you be
Our Hands
Our Eyes
Our Ears
Our Mouths
in this world?

Gods, Wepwawet

PBP2013: J is for Jackal

Here is my obligatory Wepwawet post. Wepwawet is one of my Beloveds within Kemetic Orthodoxy. He is awesome. Here is a great site on Him and other Jackal deities: Per Sabu.org.

Now that you have looked up historical information on Wepwawet on that website, I can talk about Him as a devotee. And I definitely relate to Him as a son of Aset. I have a statue of Him along with a few necklaces (beaded and otherwise), a glass for offerings, a candle, a red ninja rubber ducky with nun-chucks, a pack of tobacco and a stone for His shrine.

The rubber ducky song always goes in my head when I look at it. He communicates through songs that get stuck in my head for no reason. He seems to like blues, blacks, golds or reds. For offerings He likes beef, chicken, meats, red wine, beer, water, pomegranate tea, raspberry tea, red juices, rum, fruits and vegetables.

Here is a prayer I wrote using His epithets from Terence DuQuesne’s works especially Salakhana Trove and Anubis, Upwawet and Other Deities.

Adoration to You, Wepwawet
Lord of Lords, Leader of the Gods
Opener of the Ways, Divine Jackal
Beautiful God, Powerful One
One with Sharp Arrows
Glorious One, Lord of the Shedshed
Son of Ra, Son of Aset
Lord of Asyut
Hear my/our prayer…

Aset, Auset, Isis, Oracles, Poems, Poetry,

I am Not Hetharu/Hathor

I am Not Hetharu
by JewelofAset

I am not Hathor
I am not Hetharu
the Goddess of Motherhood, Sex and Love
These are Her domains
Not Mine
Not Mine
Not Mine
We are both Goddesses of Creation
We both gave birth to the Sun God
We are Ladies of the West
We transition from life to death
But, child
We are not the same
I am not Hetharu
and She is not Me
We have much in common
Her and I
and places where We may overlap
even syncretize
as Aset-Hetharu or Hetharu-Aset
But We are not the same Goddess
We are not interchangeable
When you call upon Me
you are not also
calling upon Her
unless We are coming
as One in Our syncretic form
I am the Goddess of authority, magical power and ancestral lineage
Hetharu is the Goddess of motherhood, pleasure and love
I am the Single Mother
I raised My child alone
Hetharu is not a single mother
She has a husband and a son
I am the Goddess of Love
when it is family love or friendship
Not for lovers
Not for romance
Unless you intend to be as dedicated to your Love
as I am to Wesir
And He died
Why would you ask Me for something
that I loved and lost?
I am the Sorrowful Wife!
I am the Mourning Woman!
Do you want to become a widow?
Why are you asking Me for this?
I am Not Hetharu
I am Not Hathor
She is the Goddess of romantic love
I am the Goddess of childbirth
because children carry on the ancestral lineage of their parents
I am not the Goddess of conception
I am not the Goddess of the bedroom
That is for Hathor
That is for Hetharu
Not Me

Aset, Auset, Isis, Goddesses, Mystery

PBP2013: I is for Indigenous Goddess

This post was inspired by Galina Krasskova’s post here: We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Theories

Aset is a Goddess of ancient Egypt (Kemet to its people); she is a Goddess with Egyptian origins and Egyptian attributes. She is a Goddess of Kingship, Magic/Heka (life-power), authority and power, ancestral traditions, the dead, the fertility of the land, the Nile river and the rains, the sun, the star Sopdet, the Night Sky and its stars, and many more attributes. She is a multifaceted Goddess with many faces and many names.

She’s a complex Goddess. Many people first coming to Aset or Kemetic Religion may ask the question: “How do you know She is real?”

Many ancient cultures and indigenous religions would not fathom asking that question. They had an active community in perpetual right relationship with their Gods and Goddesses. And even if they went to other lands they honored those lands’ deities as well as their own. It was a part of creation that the deities were and are real.

The question isn’t “Is She real?”. Pondering their existence or lack thereof is irrelevant. One’s lack of belief or even my belief doesn’t make Her any less real. She is a Goddess: a sentient, independent, incorporeal entity. She exists whether or not I believe in Her. They are real. She is real. Now what? The question is “How do you maintain a good relationship with Her?”

Beginning a relationship with Aset or any deity, is like learning a new skill. It takes time and practice.

Make a shrine. Do a simple ritual. Light a candle. Light incense or essential oil. Give offerings.

Do this consistently. Once a day. Once a month. Once a week. Once a year, even. For this is the method of right relationship. This is how good relationships with Holy Powers are maintained.

And when this happens, blessings flow. The Goddess grants Her blessings to those who honor Her. And one’s life will be imbued with Her Presence.

And the question will become “How can I believe in Her? How can I not?”