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Epithets of the Goddess Athena

Epithets of Athena/Athene
Ageleia–Leader of the People
Agestratos-Host Leading
Aglauros-Dewfall
Agoraia-of the Market
Aithyia–Navigation or Sea Bird
Alalkomeneia–Repeller of Danger or She Who Wards Off
Alea–Protectress or Shelter
Amboulia–Counsellor, Of the Counsels
Anemôtis–Of the Winds
Apatouria–Deceiver, Of Deception
Apatouria-of the Apatouria Festival
Archegetes–Founder of the City
Areia–Warlike
Athenon Medeousa–Queen of Athens
Atrytone–Unwearying
Axiopoinos–Avenger
Boulaia–Of the Council
Chalkioikos–Of the Bronze House
Deino-Awful
Dios Ekgegauia–Zeus-Born
Diwia–Divine
Eryma–Defender
Ergane–Worker (Patron of Crafts and Artisans)
Gigantoleteira–Destroyer of Giants
Gigantoletis–Destroyer of Giants
Glaukopis–Bright-Eyed or Gleaming Eyed or Owl Eyed or Blue Eyed or Gray Eyed
Glaukos–Fierce Eyes
Glorious Goddess
Gorgolaphas–Gorgon-Crested
Gorgopis-Gorgon Eyed
Hellotis–Broad Faced
Hephaisteia–Of Hephaistos
he Theos-The Goddess
Hippia–Of the Horse
Hygieia–Of Good Health or Healer
Keleutheia–Of the Road
Khalinitis–Bridler (of Horses)
Khalkioikon–Of the Bronze House
Kissaia–Of the Growing Ivy
Kolokasia–Of the Edible Tubers
Kranaiês–Of Cornel-Wood
Koriê–Maiden
Koryphagenês–Born of the Head
Koryphasia–Of the Head
Kranaia-Fulfiller
Kyparissia–Of the Cypress Grove
Leitis–Distributer of War Booty
Makhanitis–Contriver (of Plans and Devices)
Mechanitis-Skilled in Inventing
Meter–Mother
Moria–Of the Olive Tree
Nike–Victory
Nikephoros-Victory Bringing
Ophthalmitis–Of the Eyes
Oxyderkês–With Penetrating Gaze or Clear-Sighted
Paiônia–Healer
Pallas–Brandishing Her Spear or Aegis; or named for Pallas a friend of Athene
Panakhais-Goddess of the Akhaean League
Pandrosos-All Bedewing
Parthenos–Virgin or Maiden
Pareias-Snake
Patroia-Paternal; of the Fathers; Ancestral Goddess
Phatria–Goddess of inherited from the ancestors
Polemadoke–War Sustaining
Polias–Of the City
Poliakhos-City Holding
Poliatis–Keeper of the City
Poliouchos–Protectress of the City
Polymetis–Cunning in Many Ways or Very Cunning
Potniya–Lady
Potnia Egrekydoimos-The Queen Who Delights in Tumults, Wars and Battles
Promachos–Fighter in Front or Champion
Promakhorma–Guardian of Anchorage
Pronoia–Foresight
Pronaia–Before the Temple
Saitidos-of Sais, Egypt
Salpinx–War Trumpet
Sophia-Wisdom
Soteira–Savior
Sthenias–Strong, Mighty
Strife-Stirring
Tritogeneia–Triton Born; Born on Lake Triton
Tritonia-Triton Born; Born on Lake Triton; Born on Lake Tritonis in Libya
Tritonis-Born on Lake Triton; Born on Lake Tritonis in Libya
Xenia–Of Hospitality, Of the Foreigner
Zosteria–Of the Girdle

English Epithets of Athena
Almighty
All-Protecting Queen
All-Saving Goddess
Blue Eyed
Blue Eyed Maiden
Bright Eyed
Clever One
Courageous
Daughter of Aegis-Bearing Zeus
Divine
Dread Guardian
Dread Rouser of Battle-Strife
Gleaming Eyed
Glorious Goddess
Gray Eyed
Great Goddess
Inventive
Lady
Mistress of Animals
Mistress Who Delights in the Clamorous Cry of War and Battle and Slaughter
Of the Golden Spear
One Who is Ever Near
Owl-Eyed
Shield Bearing Goddess
Shining Among the Goddesses
Unwearied Leader of the Host

Epithets of Shrines and Cult Centers
Agoraia–Of the Market Place
Aithyia–Of the Gannet Colony
Alalkomenê– Of Alalkomenai (in Boiotia)
Alalkomenêis–Of Alalkomenai (in Boiotia)
Alea– Of Aleos (hero Arkadia)
Alektor–Rooster
Aiantis–Of Aias (hero Salamis)
Asia–Of Asia Minor
Hippolaitis–Of Hipplas (in Lakonia)
Ilia–Of Ilios (Troy)
Itonia–Of Itonos (in Thessalia)
Itonia–Of Itonos (hero Boiotia)
Kydonia–Of Kydonia (in Krete)
Kyparissia–Of Kyparissiae (in Messenia)
Larisaia–Of the River Larisos (in Akhaia)
Lindia–Of Lindos (in Rhodes)
Narkaia– Of Narkaios (hero Elis)
Nedousia–Of Nedon (in Messenia)
Panakhaia–Of All Akhaia (Region)
Pronaia–Of the Fore-Temple (Delphi)
Skiras–Of Skiras (in Salamis)
Skillyntia–Of Skillos (in Elis)
Sounia–Of Sounion (in Attika)
Telkhinia–Of Telkhinia (in Cyprus)
Tritônis– Of the River Tritonis (in Boiotia)

Cult and Festival Terms
Athênaion-Temple of Athena
Athênaia-Festival of Athena
Panathênaia-Festival of Athena
Khalkeia-Festival of the Bronzes (in Athens)
Prokharistêria-Thanksgiving Festival (in Athens)
Plyntêria-Washing Day Festival (in Athens)
Skira-Parasol Festival (in Athens)
Proteleia-Prelimenary Sacrifices (in Athens)
Aleaia-Festival of Athena Alea (in Tegea)
Hâlotia-Capture Festival (in Tegea)
Itônia-Festival of Athena Itonia (in Itonos)
Panboiôtia-All-Boiotian Festival (in Koroneia)

Sources

Theoi.com: Athena

Neos Alexandria: Athena

Homeric Hymns. translated by G. Evelyn-White. Found here: Homeric Hymn to Athena

Hymn to Athena by Proklos translated by Thomas Taylor
Found here: Hymn to Athena by Proklos.

Shrine of the Goddess Athena
whose source was this: James H. Dee, The Epithetic Phrases for the Homeric Gods: A Repertory of the Descriptive Expressions for the Divinities of the Iliad and the Odyssey. New York: Garland, 1994. ISBN 0-8153-1727-1.

The Orphic Hymns, trans. By Apostolos N. Athanassakis. Atlanta: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.

The Homeric Hymns: A Translation, with Introduction and Notes. translated by Diane Rayor. University of California Press, 2004.

Worshipping Athena: Panathenaia and Parthenon. Jenifer Neils, ed. University of Wisconsin Press, 1996.

Burkett, Walter. Greek Religion. John Raffan, trans. Harvard University Press, 1985.

Connelly, Joan Breton. Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece. Princeton University Press, 2007.

Deacy, Susan. Athena. Routledge, 2008.

Hesiod. Works and Days; and Theogony. Translated by Stanley Lombardo. Hackett Publishing Company, 1993.

Kerenyi, Karl. Athene: Virgin and Mother in Greek Religion. Translated by Murray Stein. Spring Publications, 1988.

Lefkowitz, Mary R. and Maureen B. Fant. Women’s Life in Greece and Rome: A Sourcebook in Translation. John Hopkins University Press, 2005.

Nilsson, Martin. Greek Folk Religion. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1981.

Furley, William D. and Jan Maarten Bremer. Greek Hymns: Selected Cult Songs from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Period. Mohr Siebeck, 2001.

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Athena

References about the Goddess Athena

Primary Sources

Hesiod. Works and Days; and Theogony. Translated by Stanley Lombardo. Hackett Publishing Company, 1993.

Homer. The Homeric Hymns: A Translation, with Introduction and Notes. translated by Diane Rayor. University of California Press, 2004.

The Orphic Hymns. trans. By Apostolos N. Athanassakis. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.

Pausanias. Description of Greece: Books 1-2. translated by W. H. S. Jones. (Loeb Classical Library, 1918; Harvard University Press, reprint.

Secondary Sources

Jenifer Neils, ed. Worshiping Athena: Panathenaia and Parthenon. University of Wisconsin Press, 1996.

Connelly, Joan Breton. Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece. Princeton University Press, 2007.

Deacy, Susan. Athena. Routledge, 2008.

Kerenyi, Karl. Athene: Virgin and Mother in Greek Religion. Translated by Murray Stein. Spring Publications, 1988.

Lefkowitz, Mary R. and Maureen B. Fant. Women’s Life in Greece and Rome: A Sourcebook in Translation. John Hopkins University Press, 2005.

Nilsson, Martin. Greek Folk Religion. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1981.

Furley, William D. and Jan Maarten Bremer. Greek Hymns: Selected Cult Songs from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Period. Mohr Siebeck, 2001.

Parke, H. W. Festivals of the Athenians. London: Thames and Hudson, 1977.

Articles

Kinsley, David. “Athena, Goddess of Culture and Civilization,” in The Goddesses’ Mirror: Visions of the Divine from East to West. New York: State University of New York Press, 1989, pp. 139-164.

Modern Hellenic Polytheism

Lewis, H. Jeremiah. The Balance of the Two Lands: Writings on Greco-Egyptian Polytheism. Nysa Press, 2009.

Winter, Sarah Kate Istra. Kharis: Hellenic Polytheism Explored. Createspace, 2008.

Online Sources

Theoi Project-Athena
An extensive website with all the ancient sources for each deity on the website. This site has myths, literature and cult information for each deity or spirit including Athena.

The Shrine to the Goddess Athena
This website is a great resource to the Hellenic Goddess Athena, Goddess of wisdom, war, crafts and knowledge.

Neos Alexandria-Athena
A Graeco-Egyptian syncretic polytheist group. They publish many devotionals for Egyptian, Greek, Roman and even Sumerian and Canaanite deities. This is the page about Athena on their website.

Athena

Athena’s Temples

Cult Centers of Athena

Athens, Greece
Athena Phratria
Athena Polias
Athena Parthenos at the Parthenon
Athena Nike in the Acropolis
Gate of Athena Archegetis

Temple of Athena Khalkioikos at Sparta
Temple of Athena Pronaia at Delphi
Temple of Athena at Troy
Temple of Athena at Miletus
Temple of Athena/Temple of Athena Polias at Priene
Temple of Athena at Phocaea
Temple of Athena at Pergamon
Temple of Athena Lindia at Lindus
Temple of Athena at Assos
Temple of Athena Polias at Erythrae
Temple of Athena Aphaea at Aegina
Temple of Athena Alea at Tegea
Temple of Athena Alea at Mantinea
Temples of Athena Nike, Athena Aeantis and Athena at Megara
Sanctuary of Athena Cynthia at Delos
Sanctuary of Athena Camiras at Camirus
Sanctuary of Athena Polias at Notium

Sources

Shrine of the Goddess Athena

Wikipedia Entry: Athena

Neos Alexandria: Athena

Athena

Athena: Sacred Symbols

Athena is the ancient Greek Goddess of wisdom, knowledge, the arts, knowledge, creativity, clarity, handcrafts, war, strategy, weaving, domestic household duties and purity. She is the Goddess of civilization.

Parentage: Zeus and Metis; Triton; Poseidon and Tritonis; Poseidon and Polyphe

Here are the animals and plants sacred to Athena.

Animals of Athena
Owl
Crow
Cockerel
Snake; Serpent
Sphinx
Griffin

Sacred Plants
Olive tree
Cypress
Ivy
Sweet Smelling Flowers or Herbs

Regalia
Aegis
Shield
Spear
Helmet
Armor
Distaff

Natural Forces
Lake Triton in Libya

Sources

Homer. The Homeric Hymns: A Translation, with Introduction and Notes. translated by Diane Rayor. University of California Press, 2004.

The Orphic Hymns. trans. By Apostolos N. Athanassakis. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.

Deacy, Susan. Athena. Routledge, 2008.

Kerenyi, Karl. Athene: Virgin and Mother in Greek Religion. Translated by Murray Stein. Spring Publications, 1988.

Pausanias. Description of Greece: Books 1-10. translated by W. H. S. Jones. (Loeb Classical Library, 1918; Harvard University Press, reprint.

Shrine of the Goddess Athena

Neos Alexandria: Athena

Athena

Bryn Mawr Hymn

Here is a video to a beautiful hymn to Her sung at Bryn Mawr College during Lantern Night, where lanterns are lit and the sophmores give them to the freshmen.

People who honor Athena today could definitely use this in their personal practice. Light lanterns or candles for Her.

Hail Athene, Goddess of Wisdom, Knowledge and Strength.

English Translation

Pallas Athena, goddess of learning and strength,
We come to you to worship you, dread goddess.
Bless us we pray; give us wisdom.
Be with us always, Blessed goddess, hear!
Sanctify our lanterns now, to shine forever clearly,
Lighting the way, making bright the dark.

Greek

Pallas Athena thea,
Mathe mastos kai stenous
Se par he me is iman
Hie rus sou sai soi deine (x2)

Hie rus sou sai soi deine (x4)
Akoue. Akoue.

Makar i ze ai toumen
He min sophian didou
He min syngignou aei
Makarthe a akoue(x2)

Makarthe a akoue(x4) Akoue. Akoue.

Hie rize nyntous lydnous
Aei phanos phanoien
Lamprynontes ten hodan
Melan phanon poiuntes(x2)

Melan phanon poiuntes(x4)
Akoue. Akoue.

Aset, Auset, Isis

A little about me

I first encountered Aset (Isis) when I was nine years old. My Father came back from Egypt with a necklace with Her winged pendant on the chain. And I got George Hart’s Egyptian Myths as a present for Christmas that year. Needless to say, once I read up on Her, I was hooked. She was strong, beautiful, smart, cunning and fierce, loyal and compassionate. She was my kind of Goddess!

I’d been researching Her even since from Budge to more reputable Egyptology sources. I discovered Kemetic Reconstructionism in late 2002 and I haven’t looked back. I love re-building what the ancients left us and re-making it into something new and something we as modern people can use.

We are not the ancients. We never will be, but we can take what they left us and bring the spirit and praise of the Gods and Goddesses of ancient Egypt into our modern time.

May She always be honored! May She always be praised!