Athena

References about the Goddess Athena

Primary Sources

Hesiod. Works and Days; and Theogony. Translated by Stanley Lombardo. Hackett Publishing Company, 1993.

Homer. The Homeric Hymns: A Translation, with Introduction and Notes. translated by Diane Rayor. University of California Press, 2004.

The Orphic Hymns. trans. By Apostolos N. Athanassakis. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.

Pausanias. Description of Greece: Books 1-2. translated by W. H. S. Jones. (Loeb Classical Library, 1918; Harvard University Press, reprint.

Secondary Sources

Jenifer Neils, ed. Worshiping Athena: Panathenaia and Parthenon. University of Wisconsin Press, 1996.

Connelly, Joan Breton. Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece. Princeton University Press, 2007.

Deacy, Susan. Athena. Routledge, 2008.

Kerenyi, Karl. Athene: Virgin and Mother in Greek Religion. Translated by Murray Stein. Spring Publications, 1988.

Lefkowitz, Mary R. and Maureen B. Fant. Women’s Life in Greece and Rome: A Sourcebook in Translation. John Hopkins University Press, 2005.

Nilsson, Martin. Greek Folk Religion. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1981.

Furley, William D. and Jan Maarten Bremer. Greek Hymns: Selected Cult Songs from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Period. Mohr Siebeck, 2001.

Parke, H. W. Festivals of the Athenians. London: Thames and Hudson, 1977.

Articles

Kinsley, David. “Athena, Goddess of Culture and Civilization,” in The Goddesses’ Mirror: Visions of the Divine from East to West. New York: State University of New York Press, 1989, pp. 139-164.

Modern Hellenic Polytheism

Lewis, H. Jeremiah. The Balance of the Two Lands: Writings on Greco-Egyptian Polytheism. Nysa Press, 2009.

Winter, Sarah Kate Istra. Kharis: Hellenic Polytheism Explored. Createspace, 2008.

Online Sources

Theoi Project-Athena
An extensive website with all the ancient sources for each deity on the website. This site has myths, literature and cult information for each deity or spirit including Athena.

The Shrine to the Goddess Athena
This website is a great resource to the Hellenic Goddess Athena, Goddess of wisdom, war, crafts and knowledge.

Neos Alexandria-Athena
A Graeco-Egyptian syncretic polytheist group. They publish many devotionals for Egyptian, Greek, Roman and even Sumerian and Canaanite deities. This is the page about Athena on their website.

Athena

Athena’s Temples

Cult Centers of Athena

Athens, Greece
Athena Phratria
Athena Polias
Athena Parthenos at the Parthenon
Athena Nike in the Acropolis
Gate of Athena Archegetis

Temple of Athena Khalkioikos at Sparta
Temple of Athena Pronaia at Delphi
Temple of Athena at Troy
Temple of Athena at Miletus
Temple of Athena/Temple of Athena Polias at Priene
Temple of Athena at Phocaea
Temple of Athena at Pergamon
Temple of Athena Lindia at Lindus
Temple of Athena at Assos
Temple of Athena Polias at Erythrae
Temple of Athena Aphaea at Aegina
Temple of Athena Alea at Tegea
Temple of Athena Alea at Mantinea
Temples of Athena Nike, Athena Aeantis and Athena at Megara
Sanctuary of Athena Cynthia at Delos
Sanctuary of Athena Camiras at Camirus
Sanctuary of Athena Polias at Notium

Sources

Shrine of the Goddess Athena

Wikipedia Entry: Athena

Neos Alexandria: Athena

Athena

Athena: Sacred Symbols

Athena is the ancient Greek Goddess of wisdom, knowledge, the arts, knowledge, creativity, clarity, handcrafts, war, strategy, weaving, domestic household duties and purity. She is the Goddess of civilization.

Parentage: Zeus and Metis; Triton; Poseidon and Tritonis; Poseidon and Polyphe

Here are the animals and plants sacred to Athena.

Animals of Athena
Owl
Crow
Cockerel
Snake; Serpent
Sphinx
Griffin

Sacred Plants
Olive tree
Cypress
Ivy
Sweet Smelling Flowers or Herbs

Regalia
Aegis
Shield
Spear
Helmet
Armor
Distaff

Natural Forces
Lake Triton in Libya

Sources

Homer. The Homeric Hymns: A Translation, with Introduction and Notes. translated by Diane Rayor. University of California Press, 2004.

The Orphic Hymns. trans. By Apostolos N. Athanassakis. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.

Deacy, Susan. Athena. Routledge, 2008.

Kerenyi, Karl. Athene: Virgin and Mother in Greek Religion. Translated by Murray Stein. Spring Publications, 1988.

Pausanias. Description of Greece: Books 1-10. translated by W. H. S. Jones. (Loeb Classical Library, 1918; Harvard University Press, reprint.

Shrine of the Goddess Athena

Neos Alexandria: Athena

Athena

Bryn Mawr Hymn

Here is a video to a beautiful hymn to Her sung at Bryn Mawr College during Lantern Night, where lanterns are lit and the sophmores give them to the freshmen.

People who honor Athena today could definitely use this in their personal practice. Light lanterns or candles for Her.

Hail Athene, Goddess of Wisdom, Knowledge and Strength.

English Translation

Pallas Athena, goddess of learning and strength,
We come to you to worship you, dread goddess.
Bless us we pray; give us wisdom.
Be with us always, Blessed goddess, hear!
Sanctify our lanterns now, to shine forever clearly,
Lighting the way, making bright the dark.

Greek

Pallas Athena thea,
Mathe mastos kai stenous
Se par he me is iman
Hie rus sou sai soi deine (x2)

Hie rus sou sai soi deine (x4)
Akoue. Akoue.

Makar i ze ai toumen
He min sophian didou
He min syngignou aei
Makarthe a akoue(x2)

Makarthe a akoue(x4) Akoue. Akoue.

Hie rize nyntous lydnous
Aei phanos phanoien
Lamprynontes ten hodan
Melan phanon poiuntes(x2)

Melan phanon poiuntes(x4)
Akoue. Akoue.

Aset, Auset, Isis, Athena, Nebet Het, Nephthys, Sekhmet, Sekhmet-Mut, Shrine, Site Updates

Site Update

Hello, everyone!

I have updated my website! I have added to each of these sections:

Aset: Aset FAQ, Offerings, Shrine and Family.

Nebet Het: Shrine, Syncretic Forms and Offerings.

Athene: Orphic Hymn to Athene trans. by Thomas Taylor and Books.

And I have added a new sections for Sekhmet-Mut!

Sekhmet-Mut’s section has: About Sekhmet-Mut, Epithets, Offerings, Festivals, Shrine, Syncretic Forms and Books.

Articles, Athena, Devotional Practice, Polytheism, Shrine

My Meeting with Zeus

When I woke up today, I saw a white haired bearded man seated on my table as I walked into the room. I’ve never had this happen before. He sat on my table and I could see him placing cards on the table as if He were dealing out cards.

“Who are you?”

“Zeus.”

I have an Oracle deck for the Hellenic Pantheon so I pulled that out and started pulling cards. I got up at one point to shower and give offerings to the Hellenic deities in my Household. When I was done, I got the inclination that He still wanted me to pull cards.

I got some cards over and over again. Messages I wasn’t getting were beginning to weave together, reading after reading. During the last reading session, He called me a “mantis” (this apparently means diviner in Greek).

A few of the messages I got were:

*fill your life with joy
*fill your life with beauty
*do what you love
*know who you are and act on it; master yourself
*love yourself
*Know why you honor the Gods you do (Thinking they are cool isn’t enough of a good reason.)
*transformation of old habits into new ones
*creation of joy
*creativity and inspiration; new projects and new beginnings

One of the things He wanted to know was the reason why I was doing things. He wanted to know why I was honoring Athena. I told Him that I admired Her and I honored Her because She helped me with my home once. The first time I ever met Her, the Goddess Athena had me write a four (or 7; I can’t remember the exact number) page poem to Her. But I also remembered I was told (by Aset) that honoring the Hellenic deities would teach me how to treat my home like a temple. That I would learn to treat my home as a sacred and holy place. This is something sorely lacking within Kemetic religion.

Household worship is the staple to Hellenic religious practice and that foundation is largely missing within Kemetic religion. So I honored Hestia today and Hera and Zeus along with Athena. I libated to these Gods of Olympos. I always give Them libations as I don’t have a safe way to burn or a practical way to bury the food offerings.

And as I’m writing this I’m remembering something Athena told me to do that I haven’t been doing. So this is a good reminder. Ask Her for help with my home.

And that question of Why do you honor the Gods that you do? is harder to answer than I thought.

There are many reasons to honor certain deities over others:

*affinity with the occupation you have
*They created you and you are Their spiritual child
*They have work for you to do for Them
*They rule over the Household and you (hopefully) live in a house/apartment/condo, etc.
*They showed up since you honor their brother, mother, father, sister, wife, husband etc.
*Some other reason

So why do I honor some of the Olympic deities? Why do I honor Athena?

The obvious answer is that She’s a Goddess and what fool doesn’t give the deities their due?

Just because They deserve honor doesn’t mean we can honor every single god or goddess. Some deities will get along with certain devotees better than others. I tend to honor deities of knowledge, order, magic, death and healing. Someone else may have different threads of influences from their deities.

My other answer to this would be that I’m an independent scholar with a Masters degree, that I bead necklaces and may start to paint. Being an artisan and a scholar are under the domain of Athena.

But that doesn’t really answer the question. Why am I honoring Her?

Athena showed up unexpectedly in my life. I honestly did not see Her coming. But She came and I just started to respond. I honored Her when I could; I try to honor Her on Her monthly festivals on the 3rd, 13th and 23rd day of each month. Sometimes I forgot or I was too lazy or I was sick or on my period or some other reason I didn’t honor Her on that day.

But when I could I’d try to show up and give an offering. And sometimes I made mistakes and did things I know not to do now. And sometimes why you show up isn’t as important as that you took the effort to show up. And sometimes why are you here isn’t a reprimand, but a question. Do you know what you are doing? Do you know what you are building or making? Do you know what it means to become acquainted with a God?

Do you know what you are doing when you honor this God instead of that one? Or you honor this God from this pantheon and this other God from this other pantheon? Do you know the relationships you are building?

Do you understand that when you honor a God and invite Them into your home, then They are a permanent houseguest? And if you need to take down their shrines or altars, you need to ask Their permission? That is not your space anymore. It is Theirs.

Do you know, dear child, do you know that when you honor a God, you are building a relationship between two beings and both have agency? And both have power.

And both of them have the power of choice.

Do you build a shrine and a relationship with a foundation of kharis (holy blessings; reciprocity gift-giving) or do you build it on superficial manners and willful ignorance?

How you build the shrine to Them is what the foundation of your relationship is made of.

Blessings flow where offerings go.

Build it well.

Aset, Auset, Isis, Athena, Festivals, Hera, Polytheism

I found a possible Festival of Hera Teleia

So I found an article about Aset/Isis (You’re shocked, I’m sure!) and within it, the author spoke of Isis and Hera syncretism.

4 Peret/Parmuthi/March
11-Festival of Hera Teleia

The article also says that this is a festival of Isis, but that she’s assimilated with Hera, so I’m not sure if this is an Isis festival, a Hera Teleia Festival or an Isis-Hera Teleia festival.

It also mentioned a triad of Zeus, Hera and Athena being honored. Hera also has an epithet called Hera of the Great Throne.

Source

Bricault, Laurent. “Un trône pour deux.” Mythos. Numero 3, n. s., 2009, pp. 131-142. The festival itself is on page 136.

Athena, Hera, Isis-Aphrodite, Links, Polytheism, Ritual Protocol, Veiling

Veiling in Pagan Religions

Here is a great Patheos article on veiling in Paganism: Veiling: A Different Take On Pagan Womanhood

Here is another pagan article on veiling: Covered: the Pagan Veiling Controversy

Galina Krasskova’s article on veiling: Pagan Blog Project: V is for Veiling (1)

Another article dealing with veiling and modesty: With All Due Modesty (NSFW)

Here is another post about veiling: 10 Reasons I wear a Veil

Here is an entire blog about Veiled Pagans: Covered in Light