Ra and His Family Devotional

Solar Flares and Sunbeams: An Anthology for Ra and His Family

by Chelsea Luellon Bolton

Ra (Re) is the ancient Egyptian God of the Sun.  He is the creator of the world, Gods and Humankind.  He is both the warmth of the sun and its fiery, scorching rays.  He is the one who travels through the sky during the day and through the Underworld at night, culminating in His defeat of the Evil Serpent.   He merges with Wesir (Osiris), the King of the Underworld and renews the afterlife and creation.

He has many forms and syncretisms with other gods.  He has many daughters who bear the title “Eye of Ra” which means they are His guardians and protectors who harness the fierce power of sun to dispose of enemies and evil forces.

Contributors can explore:

Ra as the creator of the world

Ra as the Creator of Humankind

Ra as the God of Kings

Ra as the Lord of All or Lord of the Limit

Ra and His Forms (Khepri, Ra and Atum as Morning, Noon and Night)

Ra and His Syncretisms (Amun-Ra, Atum-Ra, Khnum-Ra, Wepwawet-Ra, Sobek-Ra, Osiris-Ra, Ra Heru-akhety/Ra  Horakhty)

Relationships with Ra and His Consorts (Hathor, Sekhmet, Bast, Nephthys) and as Amun-Ra (Mut)

Relationships between Ra and His Daughters (Bast, Sekhmet, Mut,  Aset/Isis, Tefnut, Hathor, etc)

Relationships between Ra and the Celestial Cow/Mehet Weret (Forms: Neith, Hathor,  Aset/Isis, Nephthys, Nut)

Relationships between Ra and His Sons (Anubis, Wepwawet, Shu)

Ra  and  His associations with Set or Thoth or Horus

Ra as a Fatherly figure, savior or personal God

We are seeking submissions of:
• poetry and oracles
• hymns and prayers
• devotions, rituals or magical practice
• essays
• academic or scholarly articles (with footnotes and bibliography)
• songs
• short fiction (5,000 word limit)
• artwork (300dpi; black and white only)
• translations of ancient works (must have permission of the copyright owner or translator if not translated directly from the hieroglyphs)

Deadline:  October 1,  2017

Submission Formats: Word Document pasted within the body of an email or as an email attachment. Also please put RA SUBMISSION in the title of the email.

Rights: Worldwide, non-exclusive for print book and e-book formats (contributors retain all rights to their work); projected release date is TBA through Lulu.com;

Contributors: There is no monetary compensation for contributors. Contributors will receive a free PDF copy of the book for personal use and a coupon code to purchase the book at a discount.  A permission to publish form will be sent out via email once all the submissions are received.

Email: lotusjewel4@gmail.com

 

Updated Festivals of Bast or Bast-Mut

Festivals for Bast or Bast-Mut

compiled by Chelsea Luellon Bolton

2nd Akhet/Paopi/September
10-Procession of Bast, Goddess of Ankhtawy
18-Eve of the Festival of Opet
19 to 3 Akhet 10 (24 days)-Festival of Opet

3rd Akhet/Hethara/October
1-Speech of Sekhmet-Bast

20-Procession of Bast, Mistress of Ankhtawy, Before Ra She is Angry

29-Speech of Bast

4th Akhet/Koiak/November
10-Speech of Bast, Lady of Memphis

12-Speech of the Image of Bast

15-Feast of Sekhmet and Bast

1 Peret/Tybi/December
3-Feast of the Drunkenness of the Eye of Ra

19-Speech of Bast
19-Feast of Bast
20-Procession of Bast Who Protects the Two Lands
21-Bast Guards the Two Lands
28 to 2 Peret Day 4-The Distant Goddess Returns from Nubia (6 day festival)
29-Bast and Sekhmet Guide the Two Lands

2 Peret/Mechir/January
29-Feast of the Navigation of Bast

4 Peret/Parmuthi/March
1-Feast of Ra and the Eye of Ra
4-Day of Chewing Onions for Bast

11-Speech of Bast

2 Shomu/Payni/May
16-Feast of Bast, Purifying Sekhmet

 

Sources

Bakir, Abd el-Mohsen. The Cairo Calendar No. 86637. Cairo, 1966.

Brier, Bob. Ancient Egyptian Magic. New York: William Morrow and Company, 1980.

Cauville, Sylvie. Dendara XV: Traduction. Peeters, 2012.

El-Sabban, Sherif. Temple Festival Calendars of Ancient Egypt. Wiltshire: Liverpool University Press, 2000.

Spalinger, Anthony. Three Studies on Egyptian Feasts and Their Chronological Implications. (Maryland: Halgo, 1992

Sauneron, Serge. Esna V: Les fetes religieuses d’esna aux derniers siecles du paganisme. Institut français d’archéologie orientale, 2004.

Siuda, Tamara. The Ancient Egyptian Prayerbook. Illinois: Stargazer Design, 2009.

Bast-Mut: About and Offerings

Bast means “she of the ointment jar” or “devouring lady” (1). She is a lioness goddess of protection, the sun, the home and an Eye of Ra. She was the fierce lioness in some myths of the Distant Goddess. Later in the Greco-Roman Period, Bast became depicted as a domestic cat.

She was honored with her consort Ra-Atum (or Atum-Ra) and her sons Heru-Hekenu (Horus of Praises) and Ma’ahes (Mihos) at her Temple of Per-Bast (Bubastis). In Memphis, her consort was Ptah and her son was Nefertem. As the syncretic Goddess Bast-Mut, her consort was Amun-Ra and her son was Khonsu.

Bast’s syncretic forms are Bast-Mut and Sekhmet-Bast.

To learn more about Bast go to these websites Per Bast and the wikipedia entry here Bast Wiki Entry.

There is also a book about Bast called Bast, Cat Goddess of Ancient Egypt by Linda Illes. Just a note, the author does not cite sources.

And here is a great song to Bast by Catfolk: Bast Within and ShefytBast’s songs to Bast here: Songs to the Netjeru.

Offerings to Bast-Mut

Liquid Offerings
Water
Beer
Red Wine (Cabernet Sauvignon; Pomegranate-Wine)
Milk
Mead
Tea

Food Offerings
Beef
Chicken
Duck
Red Meat
Pastries
Chocolate
Vegetables
Fruit
Bread

Non-Food Offerings
Scents: Sandalwood, Cinnamon, Jasmine, Vanilla
Light: Red or gold candles
Colors: Red, White or Purple (especially as Bast-Mut); Green and Gold as well.
Flowers: Red Roses, flowers in general

Taboos
None.

Sources

1) Siuda, Tamara. The Ancient Egyptian Prayerbook. Stargazer Design, 2009. page 62.

Pinch, Geraldine. Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses and Traditions of Ancient Egypt. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Joyce Tyldesley. The Penguin Book of Myths and Legends of Ancient Egypt. (Penguin 2011), 196-197.

Golden of the Valley, Lapis of the River
This is Shefyt’s blog which is dedicated to Bast.

Bast Wiki Entry
The Bast entry at the Wepwawet-Wiki.

Bast or Bast-Mut Festivals

Festivals for Bast or Bast-Mut

2nd Akhet/Paopi/September
10-Procession of Bast, Goddess of Ankhtawy
18-Eve of the Festival of Opet
19 to 3 Akhet 10 (24 days)-Festival of Opet

3rd Akhet/Hethara/October
20-Procession of Bast, Mistress of Ankhtawy, Before Ra She is Angry

4th Akhet/Koiak/November
15-Feast of Sekhmet and Bast

1 Peret/Tybi/December
3-Feast of the Drunkenness of the Eye of Ra
19-Feast of Bast
20-Procession of Bast Who Protects the Two Lands
21-Bast Guards the Two Lands
28 to 2 Peret Day 4-The Distant Goddess Returns from Nubia (6 day festival)
29-Bast and Sekhmet Guide the Two Lands

2 Peret/Mechir/January
29-Feast of the Navigation of Bast

4 Peret/Parmuthi/March
1-Feast of Ra and the Eye of Ra
4-Day of Chewing Onions for Bast

2 Shomu/Payni/May
16-Feast of Bast, Purifying Sekhmet

Sources

Bakir, Abd el-Mohsen. The Cairo Calendar No. 86637. Cairo, 1966.

Brier, Bob. Ancient Egyptian Magic. New York: William Morrow and Company, 1980.

Cauville, Sylvie. Dendara XV: Traduction. Peeters, 2012.

El-Sabban, Sherif. Temple Festival Calendars of Ancient Egypt. Wiltshire: Liverpool University Press, 2000.

Spalinger, Anthony. Three Studies on Egyptian Feasts and Their Chronological Implications. (Maryland: Halgo, 1992

Sauneron, Serge. Esna V: Les fetes religieuses d’esna aux derniers siecles du paganisme. Institut français d’archéologie orientale, 2004.

Siuda, Tamara. The Ancient Egyptian Prayerbook. Illinois: Stargazer Design, 2009.

Hail the Summer Sun!

A Blessed Summer Solstice to everyone! I’m honoring Aset as the Solar Eye for this festival along with Sekhmet-Mut for the Egyptian pantheon. Some friends are coming over to celebrate. We’ll offer our feast (also known as dinner) to Them and other offerings such as wines, tea, pastries, cookies and candles lit upon all the shrines so they blaze as fiercely bright as the summer sky.

Since this is also Midsummer Festival for the Northern Gods of Scandinavia and other Germanic Lands, I’ll also be honoring Frigga and other Northern Gods in my home. I’ll offer wines and tea and the others can bring their offerings for Them as well.

Hail the Gods and Goddesses of Egypt!

Hail the Gods and Goddesses of the Northern Lands.

May offerings be laid upon the shrines.
May prayers be spoken and heard.
May songs be sung in praise.
May blessings flow.
May the light shine brightly, fiercely glowing in our eyes and hearts.

I’m reminded that the only time our eyes glow is when we are smiling.