Veiling in Pagan Religions

Here is a great Patheos article on veiling in Paganism: Veiling: A Different Take On Pagan Womanhood

Here is another pagan article on veiling: Covered: the Pagan Veiling Controversy

Galina Krasskova’s article on veiling: Pagan Blog Project: V is for Veiling (1)

Another article dealing with veiling and modesty: With All Due Modesty (NSFW)

Here is another post about veiling: 10 Reasons I wear a Veil

Here is an entire blog about Veiled Pagans: Covered in Light

Pork Prohibition

Aset often-times has a pork taboo for some of Her followers. I am one of those. How much one avoids pork or pork by-products depends upon the devotee and the Goddess Herself.

I saw a post on Facebook about Jelly Beans containing a pork by-product in them. So this got me wondering about other foods that may have pork or pork by-products in them.

Here are some resources on this:

The Clean and Unclean Product List from the Israel of God Research Committee

How to Avoid Pork: the Islamic Bulletin

Complete List of Yes and No Foods Concerning Pork

There is Pork in Those Pop-Tarts: Navigating the Supermarket as a Muslim

Aset in a Elephantine Papyrus

It is impious behavior to steal the offerings of the Gods. Here is one instance in which one person stole the wine of Aset and Nebet Het as They were mourning Wesir and pouring libations out to His Ka. He drank it during the Mysteries of Wesir celebration on 21 of Khoiak.

He drank wine from the vessel that was to be poured out to the Nisut and Wesir Wennefer. This is seen as a taboo to the Goddess Aset because he basically stole from the offerings during the libations to Aset and Nebet Het as they are mourning during the Mysteries of Wesir.

it basically states in the footnotes that the person is drunk.

What we can take away from this is:

1) Don’t get drunk during ritual. It is beyond rude to the Gods, yourself and the other participants.

2) Don’t take offerings of the Gods. Don’t steal from Them. And definitely don’t drink what is meant to be poured out onto the ground (a libation of wine in this case).

Source:

Bezalel Porten, ed. The Elephantine Papyri in English: Three Millennia of Cross-Cultural Continuity and Change. (Brill Academic Publishers, 1996), 341.