Aset, Auset, Isis, Bast, Bastet, Bast-Mut, Djehuty, Thoth, Goddesses, Gods, Heru-sa-Aset, Horus son of Isis, Hethert, Hathor, Khnum, Mut, Muth, Nebet Het, Nephthys, Nit, Net, Neith, Nut, Nuit, Oracle Cards, Ra, Sekhmet, Sekhmet-Mut, Seshat, Set, Seth, Sobek, Sebek, Tefnut, Tefenet, Wepwawet, Wesir, Asar, Ausar, Osiris, Yinepu, Anubis

Updated Review: Sekhmet Servant Oracle

I got the Sekhmet Servant Oracle Cards by Megan Zane. This deck is wonderful! There are 101 cards in this deck. The images on the cards are watercolor paintings done by Megan Zane with the name of the deities below each image. The card stock is good and stable, but the cards themselves are on the smaller side. They fit in my hand.

The art on this deck is gorgeous! Each image represents an aspect or form of the deity either in traditionally anthropomorphic form, anthropomorphic form with the animal head or in their animal form. Just a note for those who may be confused: Set is represented in this deck with the head of a falcon and the Red Crown. This is historically attested in the Dakhla Oasis during the Roman period in Egypt.

For the Shu card, He is depicted as a lion (and Tefnut’s card has Her as a lioness, which I thought was adorable for the Twins). Also, Anhur (Onuris) is depicted as a man with the feather crown. Anhur is a praise name for Shu. So Shu is technically in this deck twice. Sekhmet also has two cards in this deck (this is Sekhmet’s Servant Oracle, afterall).

Also, Yinepu (Anubis) and Wepwawet are both depicted here in their anthropomorphic form with the jackal head; while Yinepu is black, Wepwawet’s color is dark brown. Wepwawet can be shown in this form with a black jackal head too. I think that having them have different colors helps to tell them apart. Wepwawet is more often depicted as a standing jackal.

For Heru Wer (Horus the Elder) and Heru-sa-Aset (Horus, son of Isis): Heru Wer is in his falcon headed anthropomorphic form with the White Crown and Heru-sa-Aset is depicted in His child form.

Other deities in this deck are ones that are more common (Aset, Nebet Het, Nut, Hethert, Sekhmet, Bast, Yinepu, Geb, Wesir, Serqet, etc) and ones not as common in Egyptian themed Oracle Decks (Sobek, Seshat, Wadjet, Nekhbet, Mut, Sekhmet-Mut, Bast-Mut, Wenut, Taweret, Nehmetawai, Montu, Ptah, Ra, Raet, Nit (Neith), Pakhet, Repyt, Shu, Tefnut, Wepwawet, Menhit, Iusaas, Khnum, Anukis). There are groups of deities or spirits included too (7 Hetherts, 4 sons of Heru, etc).

What I loved: the cards and art are amazing! There are so many gods and goddesses in this deck! I am so happy that Wepwawet, Mut, Bast-Mut and Sekhmet-Mut finally get a spot in an Oracle Deck!

Things to Consider: This deck is independently published via print on demand. For only the cards, it is $38 plus shipping. There is a companion book which is sold separately for approximately $13. There is no box or small booklet. I put my deck in a tarot bag.

Overall: I would definitely recommend this deck to someone who honors ancient Egyptian Gods (especially the more obscure ones)! I would recommend this for diviners as well with a caveat that you may want to know or read about these gods before doing a reading with this deck.

This review was just for the cards as I don’t yet have the companion booklet.

Megan Zane’s website: Website

Aset, Auset, Isis, Bast, Bastet, Bast-Mut, Djehuty, Thoth, Goddesses, Gods, Heru-sa-Aset, Horus son of Isis, Hethert, Hathor, Khnum, Mut, Muth, Nebet Het, Nephthys, Nit, Net, Neith, Nut, Nuit, Oracle Cards, Sekhmet, Sekhmet-Mut, Seshat, Set, Seth, Sobek, Sebek, Tefnut, Tefenet, Wepwawet, Wesir, Asar, Ausar, Osiris, Yinepu, Anubis

Sekhmet Servant Oracle Cards

I got the Sekhmet Servant Oracle Cards by Megan Zane. This deck is wonderful! There are 101 cards in this deck. The images on the cards are watercolor paintings done by Megan Zane with the name of the deities below each image. The card stock is good and stable, but the cards themselves are on the smaller side. They fit in my hand.

The art on this deck is gorgeous! Each image represents an aspect or form of the deity either in traditionally anthropomorphic form, anthropomorphic form with the animal head or in their animal form. Just a note for those who may be confused: Set is represented in this deck with the head of a falcon and the Red Crown. This is historically attested in the Dakhla Oasis during the Roman period in Egypt.

For the Shu card, He is depicted as a lion (and Tefnut’s card has Her as a lioness, which I thought was adorable for the Twins). Also, Anhur (Onuris) is depicted as a man with the feather crown. Anhur is a praise name for Shu. So Shu is technically in this deck twice. Sekhmet also has two cards in this deck (this is Sekhmet’s Servant Oracle, afterall).

Also, Yinepu (Anubis) and Wepwawet are both depicted here in their anthropomorphic form with the jackal head; while Yinepu is black, Wepwawet’s color is dark brown. Wepwawet can be shown in this form with a black jackal head too. I think that having them have different colors helps to tell them apart. Wepwawet is more often depicted as a standing jackal.

For Heru Wer (Horus the Elder) and Heru-sa-Aset (Horus, son of Isis): Heru Wer is in his falcon headed anthropomorphic form with the White Crown and Heru-sa-Aset is depicted in His child form.

Other deities in this deck are ones that are more common (Aset, Nebet Het, Nut, Hethert, Sekhmet, Bast, Yinepu, Geb, Wesir, Serqet, etc) and ones not as common in Egyptian themed Oracle Decks (Sobek, Seshat, Wadjet, Nekhbet, Mut, Sekhmet-Mut, Bast-Mut, Wenut, Taweret, Nehmetawai, Montu, Ptah, Ra, Raet, Nit (Neith), Pakhet, Repyt, Shu, Tefnut, Wepwawet, Menhit, Iusaas, Khnum, Anukis). There are groups of deities or spirits included too (7 Hetherts, 4 sons of Heru, etc).

What I loved: the cards and art are amazing! There are so many gods and goddesses in this deck! I am so happy that Wepwawet, Mut, Bast-Mut and Sekhmet-Mut finally get a spot in an Oracle Deck!

Things to Consider: This deck is in the higher price range for Oracle Decks. For only the cards, it is $38 plus shipping. There is no box or small booklet. There is a companion book which is sold separately for approximately $13. I put my deck in a tarot bag.

Overall: I would definitely recommend this deck to someone who honors ancient Egyptian Gods (especially the more obscure ones)! I would recommend this for diviners as well with a caveat that you may want to know or read about these gods before doing a reading with this deck.

This review was just for the cards as I don’t yet have the companion booklet.

Megan Zane’s website: Website

Aset, Auset, Isis, Bast, Bastet, Bast-Mut, Books, Djehuty, Thoth, Goddesses, Gods, Hethert, Hathor, Khnum, Mut, Muth, Nebet Het, Nephthys, Poetry, Poem, Publications, Ra, Sekhmet, Sekhmet-Mut, Self-Publishing, Indie Publishing, Indie Author, Seshat, Set, Seth, Sobek, Sebek, Tefnut, Tefenet, Wepwawet, Wesir, Asar, Ausar, Osiris, Writing, Yinepu, Anubis

River, Star and Sky is now available!

River, Star and Sky: Poems for the Egyptian Gods is now available in paperback and Kindle! These are poems I have written. They are not from ancient sources.

Here is the page with more information:

River, Star and Sky

Aset, Auset, Isis, Bast, Bastet, Bast-Mut, Books, Djehuty, Thoth, Goddesses, Gods, Hethert, Hathor, Hymns, Khnum, Mut, Muth, Nebet Het, Nephthys, Nut, Nuit, Oya, Ra, Sekhmet, Sekhmet-Mut, Seshat, Set, Seth, Sobek, Sebek, Tefnut, Tefenet, Uncategorized, Wesir, Asar, Ausar, Osiris, Writing

Upcoming Books

If you would like information on my two upcoming publications here are the links:

Mother of Nine

https://fiercelybrightone.com/my-books/mother-of-nine/

Two Horizons

https://fiercelybrightone.com/my-books/two-horizons/

Aset, Auset, Isis, Bast, Bastet, Bast-Mut, Books, Heru-sa-Aset, Horus son of Isis, Hethert, Hathor, Khnum, Nebet Het, Nephthys, Nut, Nuit, Oracle Cards, Ra, Sekhmet, Sekhmet-Mut, Seshat, Set, Seth, Sobek, Sebek, Wesir, Asar, Ausar, Osiris, Yinepu, Anubis

Review: Auset Egyptian Oracle

This is a review of Auset Egyptian Oracle Cards by Elisabeth Jensen and Illustrated by Marie Klement.  First off I have to say I love the art.  The cards are gorgeous.  The gods and goddesses are depicted in very traditional, ancient Egyptian styles and motifs.  They are absolutely stunning!  (I do prefer this art style, so I am completely biased here).  The only card I did not like the image of was the Sirius card.

Continue reading “Review: Auset Egyptian Oracle”

Aset, Auset, Isis, Bast, Bastet, Bast-Mut, Books, Goddesses, Gods, Heru-sa-Aset, Horus son of Isis, Khnum, Nebet Het, Nephthys, Nut, Nuit, Polytheism, Publications, Ra, Self-Publishing, Indie Publishing, Indie Author, Set, Seth, Sobek, Sebek, Wepwawet, Wesir, Asar, Ausar, Osiris, Work-in-Progress, Writing

Ra and His Family Devotional

Solar Flares and Sunbeams: An Anthology for Ra and His Family

by Chelsea Luellon Bolton

Ra (Re) is the ancient Egyptian God of the Sun.  He is the creator of the world, Gods and Humankind.  He is both the warmth of the sun and its fiery, scorching rays.  He is the one who travels through the sky during the day and through the Underworld at night, culminating in His defeat of the Evil Serpent.   He merges with Wesir (Osiris), the King of the Underworld and renews the afterlife and creation.

He has many forms and syncretisms with other gods.  He has many daughters who bear the title “Eye of Ra” which means they are His guardians and protectors who harness the fierce power of sun to dispose of enemies and evil forces.

Contributors can explore:

Ra as the creator of the world

Ra as the Creator of Humankind

Ra as the God of Kings

Ra as the Lord of All or Lord of the Limit

Ra and His Forms (Khepri, Ra and Atum as Morning, Noon and Night)

Ra and His Syncretisms (Amun-Ra, Atum-Ra, Khnum-Ra, Wepwawet-Ra, Sobek-Ra, Osiris-Ra, Ra Heru-akhety/Ra  Horakhty)

Relationships with Ra and His Consorts (Hathor, Sekhmet, Bast, Nephthys) and as Amun-Ra (Mut)

Relationships between Ra and His Daughters (Bast, Sekhmet, Mut,  Aset/Isis, Tefnut, Hathor, etc)

Relationships between Ra and the Celestial Cow/Mehet Weret (Forms: Neith, Hathor,  Aset/Isis, Nephthys, Nut)

Relationships between Ra and His Sons (Anubis, Wepwawet, Shu)

Ra  and  His associations with Set or Thoth or Horus

Ra as a Fatherly figure, savior or personal God

We are seeking submissions of:
• poetry and oracles
• hymns and prayers
• devotions, rituals or magical practice
• essays
• academic or scholarly articles (with footnotes and bibliography)
• songs
• short fiction (5,000 word limit)
• artwork (300dpi; black and white only)
• translations of ancient works (must have permission of the copyright owner or translator if not translated directly from the hieroglyphs)

Deadline:  October 1,  2017

Submission Formats: Word Document pasted within the body of an email or as an email attachment. Also please put RA SUBMISSION in the title of the email.

Rights: Worldwide, non-exclusive for print book and e-book formats (contributors retain all rights to their work); projected release date is TBA through Lulu.com;

Contributors: There is no monetary compensation for contributors. Contributors will receive a free PDF copy of the book for personal use and a coupon code to purchase the book at a discount.  A permission to publish form will be sent out via email once all the submissions are received.

Email: lotusjewel4@gmail.com

 

Ancient Texts, Hymns, Khnum

Khnum, Lord of Esna

Here is a great article on Khnum and Nit of the Temple of Esna (linked at the bottom). The Temple of Esna was called “Temple of the Two Souls” and Khnum’s Temple was called “Temple of the Father” while Nit’s Temple was called “Temple of the Mother”.

Khnum/Khnum-Ra Epithets
Earliest Primordial God
Good Protector
Lord of Esna
Lord of the Field
Lord of Life
Who Causes the Vegetation to Germinate
Who Creates All Beings
Who Creates the Gods and Forms Human Beings
Who Enlightens Egypt with His Rays
Who Exists at the Beginning
Who Keeps Creation Alive
Who Measures the Fields
Who is in His Great Place

Festivals

4 Akhet
1 to 6-Festival(s) (Article does not say which ones)

3 Peret
1-Festival of Installation of the Potter’s Wheel and Festival of Raising Heaven

3 Shomu
13-Festival of the Visit of the Goddess Nit
20-Festival of the Victory of Khnum-Ra

Source
Hallof, Jochen. “Esna”. UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology. 2011.
https://escholarship.org/uc/item/6k78t4w9#page-1