Books, Books and More Books!

Since my book is coming out soon, I thought I’d show you some of the books I used in my research. (Not all of them are here as some I got through the library and I had to return them).  I feel like Twilight Sparkle from My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic.  I’m getting all excited (adorkable) over books!

This collection has taken me over 15 years to build.  I just wanted to share this with others in order to share my joy.  I do not have a lot of money.  I buy books new (if it is within my budget), used or on sale.  (Here is an article I wrote about finding books online:  Books and Where to Find Them).  Continue reading

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Link: Isis and Bread

Here is a great post about divine bread and the Goddess Aset/Isis by Isidora Forrest, Priestess of Isis and author of Isis Magic and Offerings to Isis.

Here is the post: The Divine Bread of Isis.

And now I’m hungry for garlic bread!

I also have an update! I have a few more pages left to translate Aset’s epithets from the LAGG! I’m on page 76 and I need to get to page 78 (I skipped ahead and already did most of 78-81). I’m almost done! Yay!

Aset and Roses

Roses themselves were introduced to Egypt via the Greeks and Romans. The Goddess Aphrodite (or Venus) was born from the sea-foam and during her birth, a white rose was formed from the waves. This is why it is associated with the Goddess. When Aphrodite’s lover Adonis died, She cried and the white rose became red with his blood. And this is why red roses are associated with the Goddess.

Aset (Isis)’s worship became greatly linked to Aphrodite so much so that there was a syncretic deity Isis-Aphrodite within the Ptolemaic period. Aset as a mourning Goddess would also be associated with the red rose. There are also festivals associated with both Goddesses called Rhodophoria or Rosalia which are associated with offering roses to the Goddesses. (Here is my previous post on that: Rhodophoria/Rosalia Festival).

Sources

Forrest, M. Isidora. Offering to Isis: Knowing the Goddess Through Her Sacred Symbols. St. Paul: Llewellyn Publications, 2005. (Rose entry: page 258-259)

J. Gwyn Griffiths, Apuleius of Madaurus: The Isis-Book: (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (Brill, 1975), pp 39; 159–161.

Perpillou-Thomas, Francoise. Fêtes d’Egypte ptolémaïque et romaine, d’après la documentation papyrologique grecque. (Studia Hellenistica Series 31). Peeters Publishers, 1993.